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Museum für Asiatische Kunst – Staatliche Museen zu Berlin

Sculptures from the Ghandara School, 1st-5th c.; photo: Museum für Asiatische Kunst – Staatliche Museen zu Berlin
Sculptures from the Ghandara School, 1st-5th c.; photo: Museum für Asiatische Kunst – Staatliche Museen zu Berlin

Berlin’s Museum für Asiatische Kunst will use the Humboldt Forum to present selected works from its collection while simultaneously outlining the social context in which they emerged and juxtaposing them with contemporary art from around the world.

The museum’s rich collection of over 30,000 Asian art and craft objects dating from the 5th millennium BCE up to the present day includes East-Asian paintings, prints, lacquer objects and ceramics, the art of the Silk Road, Tibetan and Southeast-Asian art, ancient Indian sculptures, and Indian paintings. The museum will present large and frequently changing selections of its treasures in its new exhibition space of over 5,000 square meters in the Humboldt Forum. In addition to innovative display techniques, the museum will also feature study collections accessible to users on-site. The displays highlight the artistic quality of individual works and stylistic relationships between them, placing the artists in their wider context and archaeological and craft objects in their original cultural setting. The curators also aim to emphasize larger regional trends and interrelationships, such as how South-Asian and East-Asian art mutually influenced each other via the conduit of Central Asia, or the significance of Asian art, especially contemporary Asian art, seen from an international perspective. Far from acting as a mere window on a far-away, foreign world, the museum will become a place where visitors can actively engage and interact with Asian art – with its past and present, with its familiar and unfamiliar aspects, and its ever growing importance in today’s and tomorrow’s world.